Our Beautiful World

KAMCHATKA, Russia
The Birds of Kamchatka


Steller's Sea Eagle of Kamchatka
 Courtesy: http://www.kamchatka.org.ru 


4. The Birds of Kamchatka


The King of the Air: Steller's Sea Eagle
More than 50 percent of the world's Steller's Sea Eagles (Haliaeetus pelagicus)

nest on the peninsula.
No other bird in Kamchatka can rival with Steller's sea eagle in beauty and majesty.
Steller's sea eagle is relict predator inhabits both coasts of the peninsula.
His unproportionally big beak and monstrous claws can carry deathly wounds to a deer
or a sheep; however, they are specified to catch and "finish" salmon.

The Steller's sea eagle is one of the leaders in Russian ornitofauna with the stretch of wings
of up to 2,5 meters, and the sizes of his nests are probably incompatible. In the Kronotsky Zapovednik, an old nest of many years was found the height of which reached nearly
two meters and the diameter was 3 meters!


Steller's Eagle discussing whose turn to eat next.
Courtesy: http://www.kamchatkapeninsula.com/

An eagle usually lays two eggs, but only one of the two fledglings grows up to flap his wings
in the skies. The Steller's sea eagle is very cautious and sensitive to his "privacy".
Actually Kamchatka is the only place of their residence. The Steller's sea eagle's
population (there are over 4,000 birds with about a 1,000 nesting pairs in the peninsula) is
relatively successful and can keep this status unless the human being starts its "victorious"
march across wild Kamchatka.

  
Black brant (Branta nigricans) and the golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos)

In the Nalychevsky nature park, one of the three regional nature parks, in the Nalycheva River
valley, sorrounded by the Zupanovsky, Koryaksky, Avachinsky and Dzenzur volcanoes,
rare species include the black brant (Branta nigricans), Steller's eagle (Haliaeetus pelagicus),
white-tailed sea eagles,gyrfalcon (Falco rusticolus) ,peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus)
and the golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos).

Out on the Commander Islands, about sixty bird species nest, and approximately one hundred
more use the islands as stopovers on their migratory routes.

Of notes is the intermingling of American and Euroasian species, and the high overall bird
populations.


Cormorants



Whooper swan, Cygnus cygnus



 
Bewick's swan, Cygnus bewickii
Photo: © Kondratsjev A. Jakovievisj and © Arbusov E. Valentinovisj
All pictures from "Endangered Animals of Russia: from knowledge to action (www.nature.ok.ru)"



Bewick's swan, Cygnus bewickii

more text to come
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



Gyrfalcon, Falco rusticolus

Gyrfalcon, Falco rusticolus
click here


---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



Peregrine falcon, Falco peregrinus
Photo: © Tom Holden

Peregrine falcon, Falco peregrinus
A large robust falcon with tapered tail and long, angular wings, found on both coastal and
inland cliffs. Adults have slate-grey upper parts with paler rump and delicately barred tail.
Peregrines swoop on their prey of pigeons, seabirds and grouse from height at
speeds of 150 - 250 Km/h!



Nordmann's greenshank, Tringa guttifer
Photo from Shiokawa Tidalflat Preservation Association

Nordmann's greenshank, Tringa guttifer
This species has a very small, declining population as a result of the development of coastal
wetlands throughout its range, principally for industry, infrastructure projects and aquaculture.
It therefore qualifies as Endangered.


Identification: 29-32 cm. Medium-sized sandpiper with slightly upturned, bicoloured bill and
shortish yellow legs. Breeding adults are boldly marked, with whitish spots and spangling on
blackish upperside, heavily streaked head and upper neck, broad blackish crescentic spots
on lower neck and breast and darker lores. In flight, shows all-white uppertail-coverts and
rather uniform greyish tail. Toes do not extend beyond tail tip. Juvenile is browner above
than non-breeding adult, has whitish notching on scapular and tertial fringes, pale buff
wing-covert fringes and faintly brown-washed breast with faint dark streaks at sides.
Text above from www.birdlife.net

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 
Spoon billed sandpiper, Eurynorhynchus pygmeus/Calidris pygmeus
Photo by: PIPAT SUTHIWISADESAK
 
Spoon billed sandpiper, Eurynorhynchus pygmeus/Calidris pygmeus
© Photo: C. Zöckler, Chukotka, 2000 and © Photo: Chris Schenk 2000

Spoon billed sandpiper, Eurynorhynchus pygmeus
click here

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



Aleutian tern, Sterna kamtschatica
© www.nature.ok.ru

Aleutian tern, Sterna kamtschatica
more text here



   
Osprey, Pandion haliaeetus
Photo: © Lubis Arunas, © Kaso Vladimir Nikolaevisj and © Jakusjkin Vladislav Timofeevitsj
All pictures from "Endangered Animals of Russia: from knowledge to action (www.nature.ok.ru)"




mere tekst her



White-tailed sea eagle, Haliaeetus albicilla
Photo: © Khabrij W. Mikhajlovitsj
Picture from "Endangered Animals of Russia: from knowledge to action (www.nature.ok.ru)"



White-tailed sea eagle, Haliaeetus albicilla


more text here


  
Long-billed murrelets, Brachyramphus perdix
A picture of the Long-billed murrelets was not easy to find, so thanks to Jay and © Kevin J. McGowan.

Long-billed murrelets, Brachyramphus perdix

more text to come


Slaty-backed gull, Larus schistisagus
© www.muratasystem.or.jp/~rausu/ (not valid as per Sept 2010)

Slaty-backed gull, Larus schistisagus
more text to come


 
Murres, Uria aagle, Uria lomvia
 Dickschnabellumme  Guillemot de Brünnich
Photo © Ian Francis from wildlifeweb.co.uk and © Hallvard Strøm, Norsk Polarinstitut

Murres, Uria aagle, Uria lomvia
more text to come



Tufted puffins, Fratercula cirrhata
Photo: Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, USGS

Tufted puffin, Fratercula cirrhata
text to come


 
Pelagic cormorants, Phalacrocorax pelagicus
Photo: © filin.km.ru and © Lasse J. Laine

Pelagic cormorant, Phalacrocorax pelagicus
See also Cormorants here at www.vulkaner.no
and the Spectacled Cormorant at www.vulkaner.no
more text to come


  
Yellow-billed loon, Gavia adamsii
Photo: © Solovev M. Jurevisj, © Solovev M. Jurevisj and © Tomkoritsj P. Stanislavovitsj
All pictures from "Endangered Animals of Russia: from knowledge to action (www.nature.ok.ru)"



Yellow-billed loon, Gavia adamsii

text to follow


 
Lesser white-fronted goose, Anser erythropus
Photo: © Kretsjmar A. Vasilevitsj and © Ovsjaikov I. Gordeevitsj
All pictures from "Endangered Animals of Russia: from knowledge to action (www.nature.ok.ru)"



Lesser white-fronted goose, Anser erythropus

more text to come


Emperor goose, Anser canagicus
Photo: P. Tomkovich, Arctic Bird Library

Emperor goose, Anser canagicus
Native to north-west Alaska and north-eastern Siberia, these beautiful birds are often raised
by aviculturalists. Sexes are marked the same but the females are slightly smaller.
They breed along the coast where they feed mostly on seaweeds, plus some small marine
animal life. Incubation of the 3—8 cream-colored eggs takes 24—25 days.
The grey goslings are fully feather within 3 weeks.
After breeding season, the birds move to the tundra, where they survive on grasses and berries.
More pictures here: www.feathersite.com



Aleutan Canadian geese, Branta minima leucopareia or Branta canadensis leucopareia?

Aleutan Canadian goose, Branta minima leucopareia
Small goose with gray breast, black neck and front of head, white cheek patches that don't
meet under the throat, and large white neck band; male and female are marked the same
Most of the population today is limited to wildlife refuges
Nest Site in grass near water on a rise; nest guarded by male and female prior to setting,
by male after setting begins

1750 First known introduction of foxes onto Aleutian Islands was supposedly made to
make their capture easier and their escape less likely because of the water barrier
surrounding the island.

1750-1936 Arctic foxes and red foxes were introduced to at least 190 islands within the
breeding range of the Aleutian Canada goose in Alaska.
1811 First complaints were received from Aleut Natives that foxes had caused severe declines
in birds that had once been numerous.
1938-1962 Aleutian Canada geese were not found on any of the islands where they historically
nested and were thought to be extinct.
1963 Fish and Wildlife Service biologists found a remnant population on remote Buldir Island in
the western Aleutian Islands. The population was estimated at between 200 and 300 birds.
1999 The population exceeded 30,000 geese, over four times the original goal for delisting.
Above history from "Road to Recovery for the Aleutian Canada Goose"

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

  
Bald eagle, Haliaeetus leucocephalus
Photo: Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, USGS

Bald eagle, Haliaeetus leucocephalus
click here

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Spectacled cormorant, Phalacrocorax perspicillatus

Spectacled cormorant, Phalacrocorax perspicillatus
click here

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Rock Ptarmigan,summer
Photo: © 1999, Masashi Koizumi



Rock Ptarmigan, winter
Photo: Karen Bollinger/USFWS

Rock Ptarmigan, Lagopus mutus
The adult rock ptarmigan is a medium sized, stocky, round-winged Arctic bird that stands about
15 inches tall and looks like a small grouse or pheasant. The female Rock Ptarmigan is slightly
smaller than males. In the winter they are pure white except for their black eyes, black bill and
a black stripe between the eyes and bill that is present in both sexes all year. Both the male
and female ptarmigan have stripes with brown and black markings in summer with a white belly
and wings. Their square shaped tail and beak are black. Also the male has a red comb over its
eyes. Males and some females have black eyeliner. Birders distinguish the Rock Ptarmigan from
the plumage of the White-tailed Ptarmigan by its black, not white, tail. Male Willow Ptarmigans
have a redder plumage.

The adult ptarmigans prefer vegetables in summer eating a mix of different plant materials like
blueberries, horse tail tips, crow berries, mountain plants of the rose family and the heads of
sedges. Winter food consists mostly of buds and catkins of small birch, and some willow buds
and twigs. The immature ptarmigans feed heavily on insects, spiders, and snails.

The birds build their nest on the ground in a shallow scraped out hole by a bare rocky outcrop.
They line the nest with some feathers and plant material. Because they need some overhead
protection from flying predators they place the nest near a large rock.
Text above from Arctic Wildlife, By Fred J. Kane


more to follow
Text and pictures on this page:
 Courtesy: http://www.kamchatka.org.ru 

 0. Main menu
 1. Preface
 2. Where on Earth is Kamchatka?
 3. Animals - Wildlife
 5. Flora - Flowers
 6. Sealife
 7. Valley of Geysers
 8. The Volcanoes of Kamchatka
 9. The Forests in Kamchatka
10. The Indigenous People of Kamchatka
11. Vitus Bering, explorer
12. Georg Steller, naturalist
13. Siberia

Back to menu - Continue to next item





bukkm.gif
ANIMALS

over 250

birdm.jpg
BIRDS

over 500

flower.jpg
FLOWERS

over 225
Google
 
Web www.vulkaner.no




Free Counter

This page has been made with Macromedia Dreamweaver