Active volcanoes / Aktive vulkaner:

Puyehue-Cordon Caulle, Chile   (ikke klart enda)


The Puyehue-Cordón Caulle volcanic complex forms the horizon in this view looking north
across the Río Gol Gol valley from the Antillanca volcano group. Flat-topped 2236-m-high Puyehue volcano (right)
is a late-Pleistocene to Holocene basaltic-to-rhyolitic stratovolcano constructed above a 5-km-wide caldera and capped by a 2.4-km-wide summit caldera.
Photo by Klaus Dorsch, 2001 (University of Munich).



What happened after the eruption in July 2011?
click here



Puyehue and Cordón Caulle are two coalesced volcanic edifices that form a major mountain massif in
Puyehue National Park in the Andes of Ranco Province, Chile.

In volcanology this group is known as the Puyehue-Cordón Caulle Volcanic Complex. Four different volcanoes
constitute the volcanic group or complex, the Cordillera Nevada caldera 1799-m-high,
the Pliocene Mencheca volcano, Cordón Caulle fissure vents and the Puyehue stratovolcano (2236-m-high).


NASA Aster volcano archives

As with most stratovolcanoes on the Southern Volcanic Zone of the Andes, Puyehue and Cordón Caulle a
re located along the intersection of a traverse fault with the larger north-south Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault.
The volcanic complex has shaped the local landscape and produced a huge variety of volcanic landforms and
products over the last 300,000 years. Cinder cones, lava domes, calderas and craters can be found in the
area apart from the widest variety of volcanic rocks in all the Southern Volcanic Zone, for example both primitive
basalts and rhyolites. Cordón Caulle is notable for having erupted following the 1960 Valdivia earthquake,
the largest recorded earthquake in history.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puyehue-Cord%C3%B3n_Caulle

Tuesday, January 17th, 2012
The new Bariloche airport closure comes just three days after the air station was officially reopened for commercial flights after several months of regular cleanup of the ash accumulated in place and preventing safe operation of flights.
This, of course, because Puyuehue still is emitting gas and ash high into the air.

Thursday, January 12th, 2012
Based on seismicity during 6-8 January OVDAS-SERNAGEOMIN reported that the eruption from the Cordón Caulle
rift zone, part of the Puyehue-Cordón Caulle volcanic complex, continued at a low level. Plumes observed with a web
camera rose 2 km above the crater on 6 January. Satellite images showed ash plumes drifting 50 km S on 6 January
and 300-450 km SE during 8-9 January. Clouds prevented views on the other days. The Alert Level remained at Red.

Friday, December 30th, 2011

Image of the Day, December 30th, 2011
Image acquired December 23, 2011

NASA Earth Observatory

In early June 2011, Chile’s Puyehue-Cordón Caulle Volcano erupted explosively, sending volcanic ash around the
Southern Hemisphere. In late December 2011, activity at the volcano had calmed, but volcanic ash and steam
continued to pour through the fissure that opened several months earlier.

The Advanced Land Imager (ALI) on NASA’s Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) satellite captured this natural-color image
on December 23, 2011. The active fissure lies northwest of the Puyehue caldera, and a plume blows from the fissure
toward the west and north. This image shows not just ash but also snow on the volcano surface, including the caldera.
Because volcanic ash regularly coats the land surface, the pristine snow probably fell recently.
http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=76810

Thursday, December 29th, 2011
Based on seismicity during 21-26 December, OVDAS-SERNAGEOMIN reported that the eruption from the
Cordón Caulle rift zone, part of the Puyehue-Cordón Caulle volcanic complex, continued at a low level.
Small incandescent explosions were observed at night during 21-24 December. Plumes observed with a web camera
during 22-23 December rose 1-2.5 km above the crater and 5 km above the crater on 26 December.
Satellite images showed ash plumes drifting 20-250 km E, SE, SW, NW, and NNE during 21-26 December.
Ash spread 140 km NW and 200 km NNW on 23 December, ash scattered 55 km SE on 25 December,
and 100 km N and 200 km ESE on 26 December. The Alert Level remained at Red.

Thursday, December 22, 2011
The volcanic alert level is red: minor eruption. Eruptive process of low intensity and stable trend.
The dangers listed in the current volcanic warning levels are reduced to fine ash falls that can cause some problems
in air traffic, depending on the movement of winds aloft. The analysis of seismic activity reveals that the eruptive
process continues even Caulle Cord with low intensity and reduced emissions of particulate matter.

Yesterday at 18:22 hours the cloud was 1 km in height. In addition, there was a product of small nocturnal glow explosions, eruption common at this stage. In TERRA satellite images from NASA supplied by the Meteorological Directorate of Chile at 11:27 pm today, there was an ash plume about 240 km, which spread mainly eastward.

The Volcano Observatory of the Southern Andes (OVDAS), National Service of Geology and Mining (SERNAGEOMIN) - reports Caulle cord activity in the last 24 hours.

What happened after the eruption in July 2011?
click here

Sunday, November 6th, 2011
The Volcano Observatory of the Southern Andes (OVDAS), National Service of Geology and Mining
(SERNAGEOMIN) - reports Caulle cord activity in the last 24 hours.
The volcanic alert level is red: minor eruption. Eruptive process of low intensity and stable trend.
The dangers listed in the current volcanic warning levels are reduced to fine ash falls that can cause some problems
in air traffic, depending on the atmospheric circulation and possible lahars side, with the occurrence rainfall and / or
melting processes. The main channels that can be affected by lahars are Nilahue northeast rivers and buttresses
southeast basin and channels Gol Gol National Park Puyehue.

Nearly five months of activity has covered the high plains of Argentina in gray ash. High winds can lift
this ash back into the air, occasionally disrupting air travel in Argentina and Uruguay.


The usually chilly river temperature of six degrees has been raised to an average of around 45 degrees
by the eruption.
The eruption also forced the evacuation of 3,500 people from around the site,
while a ten kilometre exclusion zone was also set up.

Flights have been cancled, and at least 7 regional airports closed.
other sources




The cherry industry in the Argentine province of Rio Negro has suffered setbacks from the effects of the
Puyehue-Cordon Caulle Volcano eruption this year.

Ash from the volcano killed large amounts of bees in the Rio Negro Valley, leading to less pollination in
the Rio Negro Valley.

Reports show that the fruit on the valley’s cherry plants is not well set despite abundant floration. It is still unknown
what effect the ash will have on fruit development and quality, but after a similar experience 20 years ago
the following crop was completely ruined.
http://www.freshfruitportal.com/2011/11/07/volcano-ash-affects-cherries-in-argentine-province/cerezas-1/

July 2011


Some spectacular pictures for you, as lightning provided a dazzling display of an erupting Chile volcano.
It's been shooting out a massive cloud of smoke, ash and rocks up to ten kilometres high for almost two days
Thousands have been forced to flee the area, but there have been no reports of injuries .
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LJ-sP0ihzbw

A new eruption started on 04 June 2011. By 4 June 3,500 people had been evacuated from nearby areas,
while the ash cloud reached the city of Bariloche, Argentina, where the local airport was closed.
At approximately 16:30 local time, Neuquén airport further east in Argentina was also closed due to the ash cloud.
Airports as far away as Buenos Aires and Melbourne, Australia had to be closed temporarily due to volcanic ash.


Erupción complejo Caulle, Puyehue, Osorno, Chile (recopilación de fotos)... Este video no tiene ningún
fin comercial solo mostrar los embates de nuestra naturaleza a través de? una recopilación de fotos de la
erupción del complejo Caulle, Puyehue, Osorno, Chile... Con fotos de: AFP; APF; Agenciauno; Reuters;
@LaDuhalde; @Cnyanez; @atorresriobo;? Andrea Ruíz; NASA; FACH (Chilena)...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bL5pQIU53S8&feature=related

By 15 June a dense column of ash was still erupting 9km into the air, with the ash cloud spreading across the
Southern Hemisphere; scientists expected intensifying eruptions of Puyehue in the following days, and said the
volcano showed no signs of slowing down.

1960 eruption


Eruption from the Cordón Caulle volcano, Chile, 1960.
Photo: Pierre St. Amand


Eruption of Cordón Caulle following the 1960 Valdivia earthquake
On May 24, 1960, 38 hours after the main shock of the 1960 Valdivia earthquake, the largest earthquake
recorded in history, Cordón Caulle began a rhyodacitic fissure eruption. The earthquake had struck the whole
of Chile between Talca (30°S) and Chiloé (43°S) and had an estimated moment magnitude of 9.5.
Being located between two sparsely populated and by then isolated Andean valleys the eruption had few
eyewitnesses and received little attention by local media due to the huge damages and losses caused by the main earthquake.[5] The eruption was fed by a 5.5 kilometres (3 mi) long and north west-west (N135°) trending fissure
along which 21 individual vents have been found.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puyehue-Cord%C3%B3n_Caulle

What happened after the eruption in July 2011?
click here


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ANIMALS

over 250

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BIRDS

over 500

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FLOWERS

over 225
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SEALIFE
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TRAVEL
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VOLCANO


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